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Janice Scott ... The Village Shepherd

After being ordained in 1994 with the first wave of women priests, Janice became curate in a large city centre parish in Norwich and from there, moved to South Norfolk in 1999 as Rector of a rural benefice of six parishes. After completing her MA in Pastoral Theology with the Cambridge Theological Foundation in 2008 she was appointed Honorary Canon of Norwich Cathedral. Janice now lives with her husband Ian just outside Norwich. In addition to her diocesan work and writing "The Village Shepherd," she is a freelance writer for Redemptorist Publications in the UK. She has also written and broadcasts "Pause For Thought" on a local radio station and has written several novels, all with a church background.

Proper 11 | Ordinary Time 16 - B

Sermon

2 Samuel 7:1-14

Janice B. Scott
The man's mother had died recently and he wanted to bring her back to her childhood for burial. The local church was very accommodating. The vicar agreed to lead the service and the PCC agreed that the lady could be buried in the churchyard, even though she hadn't lived in the village for a number of years.

The funeral went well and the man was deeply grateful. A few months later, he turned up at the church again, this time bearing a two foot high crucifix. He wanted to give it to the church in memory of his mother.

The church didn't want a crucifix. It was plain inside the church building with just one cross on the altar, and that's how the people liked it. They didn't want candles, let alone a crucifix.

Sermon

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56

Janice B. Scott
I recently watched a documentary of Prince William's life, made to celebrate his twenty-first birthday, his final coming of age. Soon after their mother died, both the princes went with their father to Canada, where the young Prince William had a rapturous reception from thousands of screaming teenage girls.

Although the young prince was very pleasant and polite to all the onlookers, as soon as he escaped the public gaze by going indoors, according to the documentary he said, "Phew! Thank goodness that's over!"

Sermon

Ephesians 2:11-22

Janice B. Scott
We all eagerly followed the progress recently of Siamese twins from Iran who were joined at the head. The twenty-nine-year old women had obviously spent their entire lives almost as one person, although they were very clearly two distinct individuals with individual thoughts and preferences. Now they felt that the time had come for a separation, and they were prepared to risk death as a result of this long and delicate procedure, in order to become two separate people. An eminent and skilled work force of six international experts and 18 specialists and around 100 support staff worked together to effect the separation, but it was still a very dangerous procedure, and both twins were aware that it could mean death for one or both of them.

Intercession

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56

Janice B. Scott
Prayers usually include these concerns and may follow this sequence:

The Church of Christ

Creation, human society, the Sovereign and those in authority

The local community

Those who suffer

The communion of saints


These responses may be used:


Lord, in your mercy
Hear our prayer
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Children's Story

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56

Janice B. Scott
Jane's mother wasn't very pleased. Jane had come home cradling a tiny kitten inside her coat. It was a dear little thing, all fluffy and warm, but Jane's mother didn't want the hassle of yet another new kitten in the house.

The trouble was, Jane was always finding lost kittens or injured hedgehogs or birds with broken wings, and once a duckling with a broken leg. Jane's mother quite liked animals, but as she kept telling Jane, she wasn't a vet and didn't know how to look after them properly.

Children's Liturgy and Story

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56

Janice B. Scott
Call to Worship:

Let us join together to use this time for rest and relaxation within the preence of our Lord.


Invitation to Confession:

Jesus, sometimes we are lazy and don't do what you want us to do.
Lord, have mercy.

Jesus, sometimes we are too busy and wilfully refuse to take time off.
Christ, have mercy.

Jesus, help us to manage our time and our own physical and emotional needs.
Lord, have mercy.


Reading:

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56

What is The Village Shepherd?

The Village Shepherd offers sermons, bible stories, children's stories and prayers based on the Revised Common Lectionary. These inspirational sermons, stories, and prayers are sure to touch your heart, because they reflect the simple virtues and tranquil serenity that characterize Reverend Scott's English countryside pastorate. The questions "Where is God in this particular situation?" and "Where does the Gospel story cross our own human story?" are always at the heart of these meditations -- but rather than finding overt answers, instead you will be gently led to make your own connections and discover the powerful ways in which God works. Janice Scott has the unique ability to find interesting details in ordinary life that illuminate scripture, while still challenging even the most intellectual reader. And that gift is precisely what also makes her an outstanding communicator with children.

Most weeks include:

  • Sermon based on the Gospel reading
  • Sermon based on the Epistle reading
  • Sermon based on the First reading
  • Children's stories linked with the Gospel readings
  • Children's liturgy and story (a different story than mentioned above)
  • An intercessory prayer

New & Featured This Week

The Immediate Word

Mary Austin
Dean Feldmeyer
George Reed
Ron Love
Christopher Keating
Bethany Peerbolte
Thomas Willadsen
For July 22, 2018:
  • Is There An App for That? by Mary Austin -- If only there were an app to bring people together. Citizen vs. non-citizen. White vs. black. Men vs. women. Straight vs. gay. Our divisions are deep, and we need an app -- or a Redeemer.

StoryShare

Frank Ramirez
Peter Andrew Smith
Contents
“Why We Need Shepherds” by Frank Rairez
“Away for Awhile” by Peter Andrew Smith


Why We Need Shepherds
by Frank Ramirez
Jeremiah 23:1-6, Psalm 23

I will raise up shepherds over them who will shepherd them, and they shall not fear any longer, or be dismayed, nor shall any be missing, says the LORD. (Jeremiah 31:4)

CSSPlus

Arley K. Fadness
“...all who touched it were healed...” (v. 56b)

Good morning dear children,

Can you remember a time when you were mad? (children respond) Can you remember a time when you were sad? (children respond) Can you recall a time when you were glad? (children respond) It's okay to have mad, sad, and glad feelings from time to time.

Today I want to tell you about a sad time and a glad time in the Bible.

Emphasis Preaching Journal

Frank Ramirez
Bob Ove
Mark Ellingsen
Bonnie Bates
Bill Thomas
2 Samuel 7:1-14a & Psalm 89:20-37
In this passage of Samuel, it appears David is feeling guilty for the gifts he has received. A palace has been provided for him, but the Ark of the Covenant, the casket for the stone tablets of the Law, the presence of the Holy amid the people is still in a tent. David wants to build a temple to the Lord, a great palace of worship where the people can worship God. But that is not God’s plan. David’s offspring may build the Temple but for now God is pleased to be amid the people; no temple or palace is needed.
Mark Ellingsen
This is a Sunday for celebrating that All are One.

2 Samuel 7:1-4a

The Village Shepherd

Janice B. Scott
I recently watched a documentary of Prince William's life, made to celebrate his twenty-first birthday, his final coming of age. Soon after their mother died, both the princes went with their father to Canada, where the young Prince William had a rapturous reception from thousands of screaming teenage girls.

Although the young prince was very pleasant and polite to all the onlookers, as soon as he escaped the public gaze by going indoors, according to the documentary he said, "Phew! Thank goodness that's over!"

SermonStudio

David G. Rogne
The Superintendent of Schools was having a bad year. Some contentious issues were being dealt with by the school board. One Sunday, during the coffee hour after church, I heard the Superintendent say in a particularly loud voice, "For crying out loud, it's my day of rest, too!" Someone had approached him about a concern in the school district, and he felt that there was no place he could go to get away from it. I learned right then not to approach people about business matters when they are not on duty.

Special Occasion