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Janice Scott ... The Village Shepherd

After being ordained in 1994 with the first wave of women priests, Janice became curate in a large city centre parish in Norwich and from there, moved to South Norfolk in 1999 as Rector of a rural benefice of six parishes. After completing her MA in Pastoral Theology with the Cambridge Theological Foundation in 2008 she was appointed Honorary Canon of Norwich Cathedral. Janice now lives with her husband Ian just outside Norwich. In addition to her diocesan work and writing "The Village Shepherd," she is a freelance writer for Redemptorist Publications in the UK. She has also written and broadcasts "Pause For Thought" on a local radio station and has written several novels, all with a church background.

Fourth Sunday of Easter - B

Sermon

John 10:11-18

There was a farmer living in a remote part of the Norfolk countryside who had been burgled a number of times. On the last occasion he was disturbed in middle of the night, he went downstairs with his gun and when a torch was shone into his face, he pulled the trigger several times.

He killed one of the two burglars, who turned out to be a sixteen-year-old lad, and after trial was sent to prison where he served a life sentence for murder. As part of his defence, the farmer claimed that he had no confidence in the police force. He said they were stretched so thinly in the countryside that there was no chance of them ever arriving on time, and therefore he was forced to defend himself.

Sermon

1 John 3:16-24

In the winter gales in Norfolk earlier this year, a young boy was out walking the dog with his brother and sister. They were walking in a wood, when to his horror the boy noticed a huge tree about to topple onto his brother. Screaming a warning, the boy rushed over to his brother and thrust him out of the way. But the tree fell, pinning the boy and the dog beneath its great weight. Both were instantly killed.

That boy gave his life for his brother in every sense of the words. He acted instinctively, and from what people said afterwards, his instinct was a reflection of his life. He had been well loved, full of fun, and someone who cared about others.

Intercession

John 10:11-18

Prayers usually include these concerns and may follow this sequence:

The Church of Christ

Creation, human society, the Sovereign and those in authority

The local community

Those who suffer

The communion of saints


These responses may be used:


Lord, in your mercy
Hear our prayer
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Children's Story

John 10:11-18

Winston was determined to win the race. It was partly because he wanted to be a fast runner, and partly because with a name like Winston you felt you ought to win something. Winston had never won anything in his life, but he thought he might have the chance in the school sports. Every day after school for months, he practised running. And after that, he did some weight lifting and circuit training, just to make sure he was in the peak of fitness.

And then he prayed. Every night before he went to sleep he closed his eyes and said, "Please God, make me win the race."

Children's Liturgy and Story

John 10:11-18

Call to Worship:

Jesus is the Good Shepherd. If you want to know him, listen to his voice today.


Invitation to Confession:

Jesus, sometimes we fail to hear your voice.
Lord, have mercy.

Jesus, sometimes we wilfully ignore your voice.
Christ, have mercy.

Jesus, sometimes we wander far from the fold.
Lord, have mercy.


Reading:

John 10:11-18

What is The Village Shepherd?

The Village Shepherd offers sermons, bible stories, children's stories and prayers based on the Revised Common Lectionary. These inspirational sermons, stories, and prayers are sure to touch your heart, because they reflect the simple virtues and tranquil serenity that characterize Reverend Scott's English countryside pastorate. The questions "Where is God in this particular situation?" and "Where does the Gospel story cross our own human story?" are always at the heart of these meditations -- but rather than finding overt answers, instead you will be gently led to make your own connections and discover the powerful ways in which God works. Janice Scott has the unique ability to find interesting details in ordinary life that illuminate scripture, while still challenging even the most intellectual reader. And that gift is precisely what also makes her an outstanding communicator with children.

Most weeks include:

  • Sermon based on the Gospel reading
  • Sermon based on the Epistle reading
  • Sermon based on the First reading
  • Children's stories linked with the Gospel readings
  • Children's liturgy and story (a different story than mentioned above)
  • An intercessory prayer

New & Featured This Week

The Immediate Word

Christopher Keating
Thomas Willadsen
Ron Love
Dean Feldmeyer
George Reed
Bethany Peerbolte
For April 22, 2018:
  • Good Shepherds? by Chris Keating -- Chris explores the ways our world clamors after shepherds whom we hope will be good shepherds.
  • I Loved 'em, Everyone by Tom Willadsen -- Tom focuses on Jesus' capacity to love everyone.

StoryShare

Keith Wagner
John Fitzgerald
Contents
“Living Without Fear” by Keith Wagner
“Healing the Sick” by Keith Wagner
“Actions and Truth” by John Fitzgerald


Living Without Fear
by Keith Wagner
Psalm 23

CSSPlus

Arley K. Fadness
“I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” (v. 11)

Good morning boys and girls,

Have you ever seen a sheep? (children answer) What do sheep look like?

Have you ever seen or touched a little lamb? How does if feel? (children answer)

When Jesus was a little boy, and also when he was an adult, there were many flocks of

Emphasis Preaching Journal

Mark Ellingsen
Bob Ove
Frank Ramirez
Bonnie Bates
Bill Thomas
Ron Love
Acts 4:5-12
“You’re not the boss of me,” is a catchphrase that many learned from the song recorded by the group They Might Be Giants, which was the theme for the popular TV series “Malcolm in the Middle.” It’s something children say to their parents, grandparents, baby sitter, older siblings, and anyone who actually is supposed to be their boss. And it feels sort of modern.

Yet a check of the internet suggests the phrase goes back to 19th century Great Britain!

Sandra Herrmann
The after-Easter scriptures are wonderful to preach. They concentrate on the love of God, manifested in the Resurrection. They invite us to impress on our listeners that while God has made the ultimate sacrifice quite willingly, we cannot kill God. God laughs in the face of our attempts to remove him from our world, and overcomes our desire to push the holy out of our lives. God will not leave us alone. God’s love pursues us relentlessly, in ways we cannot foretell or evade.

The Village Shepherd

Janice B. Scott
Winston was determined to win the race. It was partly because he wanted to be a fast runner, and partly because with a name like Winston you felt you ought to win something. Winston had never won anything in his life, but he thought he might have the chance in the school sports. Every day after school for months, he practised running. And after that, he did some weight lifting and circuit training, just to make sure he was in the peak of fitness.

SermonStudio

Richard E. Gribble, Csc
"I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The hired hand, who is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away -- and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. The hired hand runs away because a hired hand does not care for the sheep. I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father. And I lay down my life for the sheep. I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. I must bring them also, and they will listen to my voice.

Special Occasion