Login / Signup

The Village Shepherd

Not a subscriber?
Get a FREE 30-Day Subscription
(No credit card necessary)
Get Full Access Now!

Janice Scott ... The Village Shepherd

After being ordained in 1994 with the first wave of women priests, Janice became curate in a large city centre parish in Norwich and from there, moved to South Norfolk in 1999 as Rector of a rural benefice of six parishes. After completing her MA in Pastoral Theology with the Cambridge Theological Foundation in 2008 she was appointed Honorary Canon of Norwich Cathedral. Janice now lives with her husband Ian just outside Norwich. In addition to her diocesan work and writing "The Village Shepherd," she is a freelance writer for Redemptorist Publications in the UK. She has also written and broadcasts "Pause For Thought" on a local radio station and has written several novels, all with a church background.

Second Sunday in Lent - B

Sermon

Mark 8:31-38

Call to Worship:

Jesus said, "If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me." In our worship today let us explore what it means to take up our cross and follow him.


Invitation to Confession:

Jesus, like Peter, we don't always understand what we should do.
Lord, have mercy.

Jesus, we often try to avoid any suffering.
Christ, have mercy.

Jesus, we often deny others, but seldom deny ourselves or our own desires.
Lord, have mercy.


Reading:

Mark 8:31-38

Sermon

Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16

The Gentleman's Agreement is something which seems to have passed into history in the UK. Time was when two gentlemen could agree on some project, shake hands on it and thereafter know that both parties would regard the agreement as binding. But this is no longer the case. In the past, promises have been broken and people taken for a ride to such an extent that now agreements are seldom regarded as binding unless they are in writing, witnessed by at least two independent witnesses and drawn up in triplicate.

In this country as in the USA, some couples now enter into pre-nuptial contracts before they will consider getting married, so that their interests are protected in case the marriage fails. And with the present

Sermon

Romans 4:13-25

There was an interesting drama series on television recently about a family who had given up conventional suburban life to run a market garden in the country.

As well as the parents, there was a grown-up son and his fiancee, a daughter home from university, and a younger daughter aged about twelve. The son married his fiancee and they set off on their honeymoon, but on the way home from the wedding, the father had a road accident and was killed.

Sermon

Mark 8:31-38

Soon after I arrived as a relatively inexperienced priest in a previous parish, I was called out to someone who was dying. I did know this lady and had taken her communion on two or three occasions previously, and I knew she was sick, but I hadn't known that she was dying.

Death had never been mentioned either by myself or by her or by her husband. So when I arrived at her bedside late that night, I had no idea whether or not she knew that her death was imminent. And I wasn't sure how to handle it.

Intercession

Mark 8:31-38

Prayers usually include these concerns and may follow this sequence:

The Church of Christ

Creation, human society, the Sovereign and those in authority

The local community

Those who suffer

The communion of saints


These responses may be used:


Lord, in your mercy
Hear our prayer
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Children's Story

Mark 8:31-38

"Have you seen it?" whispered the Barbie doll to her next door neighbour.

The next Barbie doll in line was instantly alert. There were five different Barbie dolls, who lived jumbled together in the toy cupboard but who were so jealous of each other that they rarely spoke. "Seen what?" asked the second Barbie doll, blue eyes darting all round the room.

"The Princess," replied the first Barbie with glee. "Caitlin's done her hair and it looks terrible!"

What is The Village Shepherd?

The Village Shepherd offers sermons, bible stories, children's stories and prayers based on the Revised Common Lectionary. These inspirational sermons, stories, and prayers are sure to touch your heart, because they reflect the simple virtues and tranquil serenity that characterize Reverend Scott's English countryside pastorate. The questions "Where is God in this particular situation?" and "Where does the Gospel story cross our own human story?" are always at the heart of these meditations -- but rather than finding overt answers, instead you will be gently led to make your own connections and discover the powerful ways in which God works. Janice Scott has the unique ability to find interesting details in ordinary life that illuminate scripture, while still challenging even the most intellectual reader. And that gift is precisely what also makes her an outstanding communicator with children.

Most weeks include:

  • Sermon based on the Gospel reading
  • Sermon based on the Epistle reading
  • Sermon based on the First reading
  • Children's stories linked with the Gospel readings
  • Children's liturgy and story (a different story than mentioned above)
  • An intercessory prayer

New & Featured This Week

StoryShare

David O. Bales
John Fitzgerald
Contents
“Peter’s Painful Memories” by David O. Bales
“The Promise” by David O. Bales
“Name Change” by John Fitzgerald


Peter’s Painful Memories
by David O. Bales
Mark 8:31-38

CSSPlus

Arley K. Fadness
“For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake and for the sake of the gospel will save it.” (v. 35)

Good morning boys and girls,

How many smiling faces do I see this morning? If you held a mirror up to your face what would you see? A frumpy frown, a peculiar pout, a sassy sneer, or a Sunny Smile? Let's make today a Sunny Smiling Sunday. You're on camera. Everybody smile. Click.

The Immediate Word

Christopher Keating
Mary Austin
Dean Feldmeyer
Ron Love
George Reed
For February 25, 2018:
  • Much more than a promise by Chris Keating -- God’s promise to Abraham and Sarah is a promise received and a promise believed. It’s much more than a typical and easily broken promise. Like the voices of some of the young people from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, they choose to believe now is the time to move forward in faith.

Emphasis Preaching Journal

Mark Ellingsen
Bob Ove
Derl G. Keefer

Genesis 17:1-7 15-16
I heard this joke and thought it was funny and perhaps had a point.

 "Where are you going mom?" asked the youngest of five children.

"I'm going to a surprise party, my dear," answered the mother.

"Are we all going, too?"

"No, dear. You weren't invited."

After a few moments' of deep thought, the child spoke again.

"Hey mom, then don't you think they'd be lots more surprised if you did take us all?"

Mark Ellingsen
The Second Sunday in Lent was typically devoted to the theme of “remembering” [Remiscere]. The texts for this Sunday would have us remember the spiritual roots of our faith – especially the grace of God and its nurturing, surprising character.

The Village Shepherd

Janice B. Scott
There was an interesting drama series on television recently about a family who had given up conventional suburban life to run a market garden in the country.

As well as the parents, there was a grown-up son and his fiancee, a daughter home from university, and a younger daughter aged about twelve. The son married his fiancee and they set off on their honeymoon, but on the way home from the wedding, the father had a road accident and was killed.

SermonStudio

Richard A. Jensen
We will treat these texts as one. In examining them we have entered what many commentators believe is the central section of Mark's story: 8:22„10:52. The immediate context for this central section of material is the climax of the section that precedes it: Mark 6:35„8:21. We need to say a few words about 8:1-21, as it is omitted from the lectionary. Mark 8:1-9 is the story of the Gentile feeding of the multitude with bread which we have discussed in an earlier chapter. The response to Jesus' feeding of this second multitude is ironic and filled with comedy.

Special Occasion